View Portfolio List
  • MI Unit Summary
  • Lesson Plans
  • Video Documentation
  • Student Work
  • Student Reflections
  • Teacher Reflections
  • Culminating Event
  • Rubrics, Assessments, & Data
  • Resources
thumbnail

ASCEND 5th Gr. 2012-13

Inquiry Question:
In what ways does studying multiple perspectives of revolutionary events and music in American history increase students’ ability to identify and consider multiple perspectives in texts, historical/current events, and personal experiences?

Unit Plan Summary:
Unit Theme: Throughout this unit, students will... 1) Study revolutionary events throughout American History, 2) Study and perform Music from these revolutionary times and music that itself was revolutionary; and 3) Develop empathy, through the study and understanding of multiple perspectives (in historical context, musical/creative context, and for self in real-time (in the musical ensemble.)

Content Standards:
Music: Common Core:

Documentation Plan:
Weeks 1-5 photo documentation Weeks 6-10 Students taking photos Weeks 11-15

Assessment Plan:
Social Studies: Survey students to find out what they know about revolution, revolutionary events in American history, and revolutionary music. Music: Language Arts MILE Pre-Assessment Date: MILE post-Assessment Date: Portfolio Conference

Culminating Event Summary:
Students will make a presentation of their learning at EXPO, January 2013

Unit Collaborators:
Yari Mander, Rosa Miller, José García

Schedules:
Art Integration: Monday/Tuesday mornings Weekly Planning Meetings: Monday or Tuesday 2:15-3:15 Miller MI Class: Mondays 1:15-2:15 García MI Class: Tuesdays 1:30-2:30 Friday mornings: 30-minute Music reinforcement lessons with Sarah Willner, in preparation for individual Music Skills Test in Feb./March

Unit Lesson Plans

Lesson Plan Title: MI Lesson 1

Date of Lesson: 09-12-12

Lesson Objective(s):
1

Lesson Summary :
1

Music Teacher Role:
Make music, learn names, ensemble experience, team-building

Classroom Teacher Role:
Guide a written reflection at the end of the lesson

Lesson Procedures:

 

Connecting to prior knowledge of being able to read, perform, and create simple music notations

Give people different parts:  One group sings, one group does body percussion, one group plays instruments

Student Reflection questions:  What was your perspective of this experience?  What do think it was like for your classmates?  Pair up with a person from another group

Structured and Guided observation, looking for: Musical accuracy, Personal interaction (teamwork and support), individual perspective of the experience

Teacher reflection:

Resources Needed:
1

Notes:
1

 

Lesson Plan Title: MI Lesson 9-12-12

Date of Lesson: 09-12-12

Lesson Objective(s):
TBA

Lesson Summary :
TBA

Music Teacher Role:
TBA

Classroom Teacher Role:
TBA

Lesson Procedures:

5 minutes  1- start same way as last week with body percussion phrase and on 4th bar students improvising 4 beat body music  phrase

7 minutes-  2-  as a way to pre- assess their level of pre knowledge about reading rhythmic notation, Yari chooses 2  student created 4 bar body music phrases students made up---Yari writes them on board, incorrectly and correctly- asks class: how would we write this? Yari gives them multiple choice option on board and class votes which one is correct

5 minutes  3- Theme: Musical empathy--or- LISTENING PRACTICE- or : COMPLEMENTARY RHYTHM PRACTICE-Have half the class play one of the body rhythms, and other half of the class play other half of the rhythm, all together.
Tell them that when you hit the drum 4 times I want them to switch to the other rhythm- so group A would switch to group B's rhythm
and vice versa

12 minutes- 4-  Sing songs-- Do a few vocal warmups- ABC song- 1 or 2 more- then: Review Empathy song- And introduce new Mosaic project song: Mosaic Project theme song:  Also: possible introduce one more Mosaic Project song

5 minutes- See  below-CT re-introduce the notion of conversation and listening and Yari announces that today we will experience musical conversation and have them be reflecting on HOW IS IT SIMILAR OR DIFFERENT THAN a verbal conversation?

10 minutes-Then: MUSICAL CONVERSATION- Have CT remind class about their discussion of LISTENING and CONVERSATION Tell class I will give them all an instrument- One by one they will turn to their neighbor and "say" something- their neighbor will respond-they will have a short conversation- when conversation is done the "responder" turns to next neighbor and starts a conversation

At the end: if there is time CT and MT DEBRIEF the musical conversation and sketch out similarities and differences bet verbal and musical

Resources Needed:
TBA

Notes:
TBA

 

Lesson Plan Title: MI Lesson Oct. 10

Date of Lesson: 10-10-12

Lesson Objective(s):
TBA

Lesson Summary :
TBA

Music Teacher Role:
TBA

Classroom Teacher Role:
TBA

Lesson Procedures:

5th grade Ascend October 10

1- As the students walk in, have them walk the body percussion to
“Turn The World Around”- the 5 pattern-
If time- teach the clave pattern to the song too, which will be clapped

2- Vocal Warm up and possibly teach them a round- Scotland’s Burning

3-Sing 3 songs- and introduce 4th

Don’t Laugh at Me
Mosaic Theme
Empathy
Introduce  4th song:  Paz

4-  Introduction to Hand Drums lesson:

5- CT lead a reflection on the experience of being a drum corps member (group) and a soloist (individual)

Description of intro hand drum lesson with soloing

-Introduce how to position the drum on their bodies, the hand position for
bass and tone, some simple exercises to practice bass and tone, and a simple rhythm. The simple rhythm will be feature a bar every 4th measure where they drop out and simply clap 4 times, which will provide a “group
pulse” as a backdrop for individuals to solo. So, every 4th bar individuals will solo, as the group drops out except for timekeeping with clapping.

Yari question before we start: soloing can be a bit vulnerable- Yari explain his journey with soloing- how can we as a group help and support the people that are soloing?

NOTE: the simple rhythm we will learn today will serve as a good basis for learning a specific rhythm that I may teach the students later- the “tumbao” rhythm.

FOLLOW UP:

Yari’s words: Each of you had to play the same thing as the group, (be a member of the drum “corps”-)and then solo- express your individuality as a soloist.  Be the same as everyone else, and then be a little bit different. Did you have empathy for those that were soloing? How did that guide your behavior as the group? How could you help the people that are soloing.

CONCLUSION

CT lead a partner share and maybe a written reflection

“We could close with a partner share about their experiences as listeners and performers, and maybe a written reflection.”

Yari suggests we change “listener and performer” here to “drum corps group member” and “soloist”.

Close with a partner share about their experiences as group members and soloists.


Resources Needed:
TBA

Notes:
TBA

 

Video Documentation for Unit

There is no video documentation for this unit.

Digital Portfolio Examples:

There are no examples to show.


Teacher Journal Examples

Students browsed images from the American Revolution, and selected one that they especially connected with. They identified the various perspectives of the different figures in the image, and did in-depth research on the event depicted in the image through the lens of those perspectives. Ultimately, they wrote informational essays introducing the context of the Revolutionary War, and describing in detail the particular event or idea in the image that they researched. In addition, they created portraits of two of the figures in their image, and wrote shorter essays from the perspective of each of those figures. They drew on their study of empathy and multiple perspectives in their own lives to imagine the points of view of different figures in their scenes. One student reflected afterward that singing the Mosaic Project songs about empathy and multiple perspectives helped him realy put himself in different historical figures shoes. He talked about his outrage at how Patriots had treated the Loyalists during the war, and argued that "they were all humans," and should have been able to coexist despite the fact that they had different points of view. 



We've used the songs  introduced in our music integration sessions, led by our MILE teacher, as the basis for our conflict resolution/empathy training for our students.  The Mosaic Project had a strong selection of songs (Paz, Don't Laugh at  Me, The Empathy song) that also proved to be invaluable in our learning expedition that involved becoming aware of various points of view, including non or underrepresented groups that have been historically marginalized in our nation's history.  

 

Weeks: Possible Question Choices (Answer Only One)
1 - 5
  • What is the pre-assessment tool measuring during this unit (please include photo of assessment)?
  • What shared fundamental concepts are being targeted for the the MILE unit?
  • How does this photo show evidence of students' understanding of musical ideas and concepts rather than procedural knowledge?
  • How does this photo show evidence of students' progress with unit-related activities?
  • How does this photo show multiple representations of the rhythm concepts being explored?
  • How have you extended the MILE tools (matrices, songs, etc.) into other areas of the curriculum?
6 - 10
  • What shared fundamental concepts are being targeted for the the MILE unit?
  • How does this example of student work show evidence of students' understanding of the unit inquiry question?
  • How have you extended the MILE tools (matrices, songs, etc.) into other areas of the curriculum?
  • How does this photo show multiple representations of the pitch concepts being explored?
  • How does the photo show the evidence of change in your teaching practice?
11 - 15
  • How does the photos demonstrate students' understanding of multimple representation of music related to other academic areas?
  • How does this photo demonstrate your understanding and use of the rhythm and pitch matrices in other academic areas?
  • How does this photo show multiple representations of the composition concepts being explored?
  • How does the photo show the evidence of change in your teaching practice?
  • How does the photo show evidence of students preparing to "inform" their audience at the culminating event?



There are no examples to show.

Digital Portfolio Examples:

There are no Student Reflections to display.


Teacher Journal Examples

There are no examples to show.

Digital Portfolio Examples:

There are no Teacher Reflections to display


Teacher Journal Examples

Some of the music that students learned about were "Revolution" songs from a different historical period and served to illustrate the concept of music and song as a protest tool that mirrored or lent a kind of historical echo to our project.  Students learned Bob Dylan's "Blowin' in the Wind" and Joan Baez's version of "We Shall Overcome"  and came to see that music is a viable and powerful form of social commentary as well as personal expressions.

Weeks: Possible Question Choices (Answer Only One)
1 - 5
  • What is the pre-assessment tool measuring during this unit (please include photo of assessment)?
  • What shared fundamental concepts are being targeted for the the MILE unit?
  • How does this photo show evidence of students' understanding of musical ideas and concepts rather than procedural knowledge?
  • How does this photo show evidence of students' progress with unit-related activities?
  • How does this photo show multiple representations of the rhythm concepts being explored?
  • How have you extended the MILE tools (matrices, songs, etc.) into other areas of the curriculum?
6 - 10
  • What shared fundamental concepts are being targeted for the the MILE unit?
  • How does this example of student work show evidence of students' understanding of the unit inquiry question?
  • How have you extended the MILE tools (matrices, songs, etc.) into other areas of the curriculum?
  • How does this photo show multiple representations of the pitch concepts being explored?
  • How does the photo show the evidence of change in your teaching practice?
11 - 15
  • How does the photos demonstrate students' understanding of multimple representation of music related to other academic areas?
  • How does this photo demonstrate your understanding and use of the rhythm and pitch matrices in other academic areas?
  • How does this photo show multiple representations of the composition concepts being explored?
  • How does the photo show the evidence of change in your teaching practice?
  • How does the photo show evidence of students preparing to "inform" their audience at the culminating event?



Digital Portfolio Examples:

There are no Culminating Events to display.


Teacher Journal Examples

At our January 26th EXPO, students presented their expedition to the wider community. They displayed their writing and artwork, took visitors on tours of the hallway where their work and process was displayed, and performed three songs and one instrumental ensemble piece. They sang three songs from the Mosaic Project: "The Mosaic Project Theme Song," about acceptance across differences, "The Empathy Song," about stepping into someone else's shoes to imagine their experience, and "Paz," about children working for piece. Afterward, they performed Carlos Santana's "Oye Como Va," using drums, xylophones, metalophones, a high hat, other percussion instruments, and vocals, accompanied by Yari Mander on guitar. Students had to have a strong sense of ensemble and rhythm, blending together their distinct parts to create a unified whole. 



Digital Portfolio Examples:

There are no records to display.


Teacher Journal Examples

Students worked with Sarah Willner on a semester-long bell curriculum, which aims to teach students to read musical notation, recognize pitch, create original compositions, improvise within a structure, and recognize rhthmic patterns. Initially, Sarah administered the Music Literacy Skills Test as a pre-assessment of students prior knowledge. Over the course of a semester, she came in weekly to give students scaffolded, hands-on experiences with bell sets, build their understanding of various forms of musical notation using matrices, teach them simple melodies, and begin to play with structures for musical improvisation. At the close of this curriculum, students will take the Music Literacy Skills Test to measure their growth. In addition, we're looking forward to analyzing potential connections between growth in their music literacy and growth in other academic subjects.



Resources Used Throughout This Unit:

  • 1
  • TBA
  • TBA